Jump to content
Rob_Justice

What "killed" Wraith?

Recommended Posts

Temple, if you enjoyed the corebook, i highly recommend trying to get your bones on these titles:

Sea of Shadows

Risen

Players Handbook

Buried Secrets

Renegades

Haunts

Love beyond Death

Of course, all of the wraith books are excellent. So I'd check out Ebay until you get your fill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'd love to own all those, and in a few hours I WILL own a Players Guide pdf, but my economy only stretches so far.. I will definitely be searching for those books though.. Can't get enough of that wonderful Stuff!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest SKeLoRiC

What REALLY made Wraith was the RISEN book, suddenly Wraith could rejoin the rest of the OWoD instead of remaining in its own special inner city slum designed just for it.

Not to get me wrong, it was a fab sort of inner city slum, only problem was that no other game line seemed to actually VISIT.

Wraith had all sorts of retro fun in that the whole "zeitgeist" deal could be found somewhere in the shadowlands.

Want a Film Noir story?

Introduce a Roaring 20s mobster turned Wraith and his old speakeasy as part of the local scene.

Nothing was ever truly gone when it came to Wraith.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What killed it (and possibly Changeling) was that White Wolf basically oversaturated its own market. Pick up a copy of vampire, it advertises werewolf in the back. Pick up a copy of Werewolf, it advertises mage. Pick up a copy of mage... See how this is going? White Wolf released game lines one after another, wham, wham, wham. The ones that made it out there first - vampire, werewolf - did best simply because they caught gamers' attention first. And once a person has committed a few hundreds of dollars to these earlier game lines, they're going to feel a little iffy about keeping up with those lines and picking up the new ones. It's quite a financial investment. Both games also suffered a bit from "gimmicks" (Shadowguiding and Cantrip cards... Really? Cantrip cards? ) that were, and still are, pretty far outside the realm of traditional RP.

I've never met anyone who honestly thinks either game sucks. I know plenty of people who either never got around to playing them, who never bought the books, or who didn't find out about the games until they were already collapsing and hard-to-find.

If White Wolf had staggered its releases a bit, and maybe not glutted its two core lines with so much fluff, Wraith and Changeling both probably would have found a fair market. But as it was, White Wolf buried its fans under a tide of supplements for the games they were already invested in, while releasing somewhat gimmicky games that they weren't likely to invest in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think calling them gimmicks is a bit unfair. Ok, maybe the Cantrip cards were a bit gimmicky, but Shadowguiding? Really? Thats not a gimmick, thats a technique. And a damn cool one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's a technique. But with regards to wraith, it was basically stapled onto a Standard White Wolf Game™. It came off as more of an "And Also" feature rather than a core functionality or something woven in the whole.

It's sort of like those Gifts from the Bone Gnawers tribebook that require player pantomime. They're neat, sure, but they don't really fit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I think the shadow guide part was difficult for some, I think it goes closer to what SKeLoRiC was saying. In particular a friend of mine and I were talking a few months back about this very topic because we both loved Wraith so much and were sad it didn't get the same attention as the others. We felt that the lack of connection to humanity was, in fact, what did it. Many times the books focused on areas deep in the Dark Umbra and not enough on the skinlands themselves or how the Wraiths can relate to humanity.

In many ways Charon's decree was both a boon and the achilles heel to the game. On one hand it instigated the conflict between characters, but it also meant that you only ever dealt with other Wraiths and those humans you were supposed to care about because it was why you were a Wraith in the first place suddenly became a secondary matter. Maybe if the conflict was more about getting someone to help you get your passions satisfied while not backstabbing each other might have made more sense to people. In any case, just my two cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×