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Why Do I Stick With The WoD?

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Curator

It's very simple.

I stick with this World of Darkness because it is the first, and so far only, roleplaying game where the list of characteristics starts with Intelligence, rather than Strength.

And that is it.

That is all I need.

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Curator

I stick with the WoD because of it's setting fiction and mechanics, the best magic system I've encountered and incredibly compelling and mysterious lore. :)

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Donor

For me it's the writing.
I don't read these books just when I'm playing or building a game. I'll often pluck "Saturnine Night" or "Intruders: Encounters with the Abyss" just for re-reading the fiction and fueling inspiration.
The ideas and questions these game-books inspire, stay with me even outside the context of the game world.

Promethean the Created asks: What makes a human- human? And that is a haunting quandary even when I'm not playing the role of an inhuman monster.

Changeling the Lost deals with trauma and abuse... in a way that allows me to face my own (totally mundane) traumas. And it helped me understand a little better why people might lash out even at their friends in the wake of traumatic events.

And Lately I've been fascinated by the premise of Demon the Descent. The exploration of individuality by someone who used to think of himself as a tool. How new identities are shaped, how we escape what we once were.

But it's the writing that fuels these, not just the gameworld. I'm reading through the Numenera core book. And it is well written, the premise is interesting and the setting is detailed. But it doesn't inspire me in the same way as the World of Darkness books.

I feel as though the world of Numenera can be an interesting place to explore. But Changeling, Promethean, Mage, Vampire... they probe deep into philosophy, emotions and morality. And these are the places I'm really interested in exploring.

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Curator

I have to admit, fairly unashamedly, that what first got me into the WoD and has kept me here is the chance to play superheroes in the modern day, shadowy and clandestine, trapped in silent wars and in the secret societies of their own dysfunctional kind. I like that. There's a whole lot more I discovered, but that's the biggest draw.

Not what the authors set out to do, but rather good for it nevertheless.

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Curator

You might love Demon: the Descent, because that game has taken the theme of clandestine Tradecraft and espionage and run wild with it. The God-Machine provides a cyberpunk element - the characters' descent into Infrastructure on a job could invoke feelings not unlike raiding an Alien nest or a Shadowrun insect totem hive, if they had been half-assimilated by Cybermen or the Borg - and the elements of traditional spy thrillers are all there - issues of trust, corrupted Powers That Be, the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing, the fingers not knowing what the thumb is doing.

Then throw in demonspawn - because the Unchained can breed with mortals to produce half-demonic offspring - and antagonists such as stigmatics, angels, Exiles, the Malleus, the Lucifuge (how many of their 666 population are actually children of the Unchained?), and ultimately the God-Machine itself.

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Curator

I've had a look at it, and it looks fun, but I think Mage the Awakening would be my first choice for out and out clandestine.

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Curator

Mage can do espionage games - Guardians of the Veil versus Seers, in particular - but Mage can also do Lord Dunsany on the Astral, McCarthy-style conspiracy ("Are you, or have you ever been, affiliated with a Left-Hand Path Legacy?"), Indiana Jones (please, no fridges at Ground Zero), Law & Order, CSI or cover many other genres.

Demon: the Descent puts the spy thriller / cyberpunk at its core.

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I think for me it has always been the real world mythology that the games explore. Folklore is one of the oldest expressions of cultural values, and the way the different roots collide in a modern setting, and seeing them struggle to work (or at least survive) in the same world, has always been the biggest draw for me. It always seems to end up mirroring the far more mundane struggles that I and the other players have as people, growing and living together, and trying to understand one another.

I can honestly say that this game has brought my friends and I closer together.

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