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Cybercat

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Okay, if you don't like Martial Arts movies don't bother to read any further as you most likely won't enjoy this movie. This is an unusual film from Thailand. The main character in this movie is an autistic young girl which is what caught my attention first when I read the blurp on this movie. In a nutshell the movie starts when a Yakuza begins muscling in on local Thai gang turf. In the altercation that follows he backs off as he is interested in the girl friend and business associate of the Thai Boss. The two become lovers. The Thai Boss launches a series of attacks killing many Yakuza. The lady in question tells the Yakuza to leave Thailand to avoid further trouble. She breaks off from the gang and the Thai Boss to live quietly and leave her life of crime. Why? Because she is pregnant. She gives birth to a daughter who is autistic, later she takes in a boy from the streets who is being bullied. As they get older he helps look out after the daughter.

The family lives next to a Dojo and between watching the fighters and watching Kung Fu movies the daughter quietly learns the abilities merely from observation and practicing on her own as she is sort of an adept protege. By the time she becomes a teen her mother develops cancer and needs money for hospital visits and medicine. The boy stumbles across an old book of hers listing people and money they owe her. Unaware that she was part of a protection racket he and the girl go to collect the money to help their mother. They are of course, after all that time, kicked out on their asses. However, as the boy (Moom) slowly makes it clear to the girl (Zin) why they need the money (outside of Kung Fu the girl is slow to understand things). Once Zin understands she goes back and demands the money on her own. This time when they go to kick her out all hell breaks loose and she beats the crap out of a dozen thugs and gets the money.

Slowly Moom and Zin begin collecting, by force, the money still owed Zin by various groups as they desperately try to help their mom battle cancer. I won't go any further but I think you can figure out what sort of trouble this will lead to for everybody.

The start of the movie is slow and the pace of the story is also slow as far as I'm concerned. The actress does good playing the part of an autistic girl but don't look for any incredible acting or dialogue or intense plots here. This is a simple story. The main draw of this film is watching some of the most unique fighting sequences and set-ups that I have seen in a long time in a martial arts film. There is nothing slow about the action in this movie. The fact that a character who is autistic is kicking butt puts a unique spin on all of this and I personally found it amusing to see a little teen age girl holding out her hand demanding - Money! Money for Mom! Mom sick! and then beating the snot out of the thugs who wouldn't cough it up until they had gotten hammered.

Don't expect a sappy happy ending though. Without spoiling things for any of you who want to view this I won't say the ending is totally tragic or dark but it isn't a happy one. I would say the ending is a dark cloud with a silver lining in it for Zin.

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I actually saw this a month or so ago. I really liked it, the girl actress had been taken for something like 4years of intense training b4 filming began. I'd quite happily watch it again because besides the amazing martial arts it is very cool seeing her beat up grown men...

Spoiler:

My fiance did however ruin the end fight scene by screaming "cripple fight" @ the top of his lungs (southpark ref)


this is totally goin on my wish list for cmas

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I managed to get ahold of this finally thanks to netflix. I thought it was a great martial arts movie...and I loved the fact they used scenes from Ong-Bak and the The Protector. Originally my only issue with the movie was I felt the actress was trying too hard to emulate Tony Jaa's style of fighting and acrobatics (although that may be because chocolate had the same director as Ong-Back and The Protector.) but after pondering it some...I now feel she did amazingly well for her first role, both as a fighter and an actress.

I'm looking forward to seeing more of her work. Hopefully with the same director.

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