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What Martial Arts do you do?

What Martial Arts do you do?  

78 members have voted

  1. 1. Pick a flavour of ass kicking.

    • A Japanese Karate (Kyokushin, Shotokan etc)
      4
    • A Japanese Grappling art (Judo, Jiu-Jutsu etc)
      3
    • A Chinese External Kung Fu (Hung Ga etc)
      5
    • A Chinese Internal Kung Fu (Tai Chi)
      8
    • A Japenese Internal art (Aikido etc)
      4
    • A Thai art (Muay Thai/Muay Boran etc)
      4
    • Western Kickboxing or Savate
      1
    • An Okinawan/Ryukyuan art
      1
    • A Korean art (Taekwondo, Hapkido etc)
      7
    • A Middle Eastern Art (Krav Maga etc)
      2
    • An "Acrobatic" art (Wushu, Capoeira etc)
      0
    • Military trained or modern CQC (MCMAP etc)
      0
    • A Grappling art (Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Greco-Roman, Sambo etc)
      3
    • Malaysian/Indonesian/Burmese/Cambodian
      0
    • Japanese Weapon art (Kendo, Iaido etc)
      7
    • Other Weapon art (Escrima etc)
      8
    • Ninjutsu/Ninpo
      4
    • An American art (American Kenpo, Shootfighting etc)
      0
    • A United Kingdom art (Boxing, Defendu etc)
      0
    • An Oceanic art(Zen Do Kai, Mau Rakau etc)
      0
    • A European Art (Pankration etc)
      3
    • MMA (1 striking, 1 grappling)
      1
    • Wing Chun
      1
    • Kailindo :)
      2
    • Other. (Though I find it hard to believe you dont fit under one of the above)
      10


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Donor
Actually inside a range of about 4 or 5 feet, unless you're locked, loaded, with the safety off etc and aiming at your target I'd prefer to be equipped with martial arts weponry rather than a gun.

Agreed.

If you're carrying a handgun, how often do you get within 4 or 5 feet from someone you intend to shoot?

Maybe you don’t intend to shoot them (like In a hostage situation?). Maybe you where surprised? Maybe you just disarmed them and now have their gun etc etc

I agree its unlikely but can happen. I practice gun defense for fun but at the same time if someone stuck one in my face or put one to the back of my head I can take it off them pretty fuckin quickly and un expectantly. Fast reaction and hand skill coupled with psychology could well save me if I was kidnapped or say in a bank robbery etc, so unlikely yes but worth all that training if those few crucial seconds occur in my life? You bet ya.

Its the same as knife defense, I don’t plan on getting in knife fights but I train in using one and taking one off people none the less (though I'm more likely to be attacked with a knife than a gun here in New Zealand, I think you guys in America aren’t so lucky...) I've had a knife pulled on my in a street fight and it was scary. I want to be ready next time, no matter what the weapon is, knife, bat or handgun.

*snips*

My personal belief is that a practice is most meaningful when it represents an encounter with reality. You have to hit and be hit. The Chinese phrase for it is "tasting bitterness." Everyone has their own physical and psychological boundaries, but it's enough to test those against greater intensity and ability relative to your own regularly. Without that, you won't express yourself meaningfully within a discipline. You grow complacent.

I agree yes, but in saying that I see no reason in "getting hurt learning how not to get hurt" as my master once said. I am not a cagefighter I don’t want to sit there and condition myself, I dont need to get punched in the face to know it hurts, I know it hurts. I don’t need to have my wrist bent awkwardly by an instructor to know its an effective lock. In saying that some people have focus issues, have problems with "force of mind" and its probably easier for them to just spar and get knocked around than to train with a realistic mindset and risk complacency.

For instance, I've been paired off against people I could pretty much manhandle in kung fu lately, and it was inspiring me to do a bunch of things that were excessively fancy, like a whole bunch of qinna reversals. I had that smacked out of me last week and yesterday, when I crossed arms with my teacher and an elder brother (in the kung fu sense) who's done some full contact training in China. That shocked me back into using core skills and refining them instead of the flowery, peripheral crap I'd been getting away with. That's how real pressure compared to your ability creates sincerity and growth.

Fully agreed. I have recently had a similar experience. Its those core skills that will show themselves when the shit hits the fan, its those skills that will automatically go into action for you, not the flowery stuff. Thankfully for me the style of Wing Chun I have been taught has no flowery at all, and though I have learnt a little bit of Qin Na I'm not a fan of locks and have concentrated on just punching people in the throat :) I don’t want to fuck about trying to grapple with some of the guys on the streets of New Zealand, you seen the All Blacks play bro? There’s some big islander boys round here that can knock a guy their own size down on the field with ease let alone a guy my size on the street. No matter what an art says about controlling bodyweight and using an opponents force against him (I've done Aikido too) that shit just aint gunna fly when a 200kg six and a half foot rugby player is punching at your head as hard and fast as he can (or two of them for that matter).

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WhiteWolf
I agree yes, but in saying that I see no reason in "getting hurt learning how not to get hurt" as my master once said. I am not a cagefighter I don’t want to sit there and condition myself, I dont need to get punched in the face to know it hurts, I know it hurts. I don’t need to have my wrist bent awkwardly by an instructor to know its an effective lock. In saying that some people have focus issues, have problems with "force of mind" and its probably easier for them to just spar and get knocked around than to train with a realistic mindset and risk complacency.

I disagree. You do need to take the odd knock. For instance, getting hit in the face teaches you to keep your composure, kep your hands up and keep your shoulders forward and chin tucked to deal with it -- and it teaches you to avoid getting hit in the face again. That said, everyone has their limits. Not everybody can or should train like Fedor Emilianko, but they way he trains is a landmark worth respecting. Plus, full contact training is not broken faces, all the time. Its about getting *stung*, not hurt.

You need to spar to have a working set of tools. You dont need to use full force every time (and even arts that emphasize full contact do go lighter in training). Its that simple. You'll see how different things look under pressure. To make this work, you need a friendly working relationship with your partners.

If you want an example from your own art, look up Alan Orr's wing chun. They compete in MMA.

Fully agreed. I have recently had a similar experience. Its those core skills that will show themselves when the shit hits the fan, its those skills that will automatically go into action for you, not the flowery stuff. Thankfully for me the style of Wing Chun I have been taught has no flowery at all, and though I have learnt a little bit of Qin Na I'm not a fan of locks and have concentrated on just punching people in the throat :) I don’t want to fuck about trying to grapple with some of the guys on the streets of New Zealand, you seen the All Blacks play bro? There’s some big islander boys round here that can knock a guy their own size down on the field with ease let alone a guy my size on the street. No matter what an art says about controlling bodyweight and using an opponents force against him (I've done Aikido too) that shit just aint gunna fly when a 200kg six and a half foot rugby player is punching at your head as hard and fast as he can (or two of them for that matter).

Well, I do happen to be six and a half feet tall and 265 lbs, so thats not a big problem for me:-) There's a time and place for pretty much anything under the sun. Thats why today was BJJ, and yesterday was Kali and Silat, and for me, tomorrow is kickboxing.

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With the college year finishing up, I should be back at ninpo for a few months, without Judo to keep me fit I've noticed serious deterioration.

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Donor
I disagree. You do need to take the odd knock. For instance, getting hit in the face teaches you to keep your composure, kep your hands up and keep your shoulders forward and chin tucked to deal with it -- and it teaches you to avoid getting hit in the face again.

Doing the 1st form of WC and meditation teaches me to keep my composure, as much as sparring does. Ive been in too many street fights as a kid to play around and fake fighting, and realistically no one is ever fully composed, calm and collected. Maybe in the ring, a trained professional MMA figther might be, but not on the street when weapons and multiple opponents are involved. As for keeping your shoulders forward and chin down this is the opposite of what I want to be doing. In Wing Chun we keep our shoulders back and relaxed (as shoulder hunching promotes tension and therefore loss of power) and our chin up (lowering your chin makes the bridge of your nose closer to your opponent and therefore a more prominent target).

That said, everyone has their limits. Not everybody can or should train like Fedor Emilianko, but they way he trains is a landmark worth respecting. Plus, full contact training is not broken faces, all the time. Its about getting *stung*, not hurt.

Training hard and tough is worth respecting yes, and I am not disputing that it turns out some badasses, I just don’t think that it is absolutely necessary and does not make a fighter (once again I draw the distinction between competition ring fighting which I have little knowledge of, and street self defense).

You need to spar to have a working set of tools. You don’t need to use full force every time (and even arts that emphasize full contact do go lighter in training). Its that simple. You'll see how different things look under pressure. To make this work, you need a friendly working relationship with your partners.

I have a working set of tools and I have never sparred. I have used these tools to combat several opponents attacking me simultaneously, something light sparring with a partner will never simulate accurately. I have been attacked with a knife, something sparring will never simulate (even fake knives we train with or stick sparring as in Escrima). I do not want to practice using half force, I am training myself to respond suddenly and violently with all my force. I do not see the sense in conditioning, unless there’s a way to condition the testicles, eyes, nose and Adams apple, because that’s where I will be striking.

If you want an example from your own art, look up Alan Orr's wing chun. They compete in MMA.

Alan Orr is a bit of a joke over here mate, no offense. These American Wing Chun practitioners that have "taken WC to a new level" make me laugh. Its like saying that he has improved the art, made it more badass, when in reality he deviates from the core fundaments with every change he makes. I am a 3rd generation Yip Man student, my master has also trained under Choi Tsun Tin (current grandmaster), which means I am of lower generation than Alan Orr, so called master. Undoubtedly he is a badass, someone I would not want to mess with, and has trained longer and harder than I ever will, so respect for that, but the idea of "competition Chi Sau" (his words) is ridiculous and I wonder what Choi Tsun Tin would say about this (never mind the use of Wing Chun in MMA competitions).

Well, I do happen to be six and a half feet tall and 265 lbs, so thats not a big problem for me:-) There's a time and place for pretty much anything under the sun. Thats why today was BJJ, and yesterday was Kali and Silat, and for me, tomorrow is kickboxing.

Nice, then you're probably not familiar with fighting against vastly larger and stronger opponents. I understand the benefits of training under multiple martial arts, especially in competition fighting. For fun also, as I love any martial art really, and am a big fan of weapon arts. Once again though, on the street things are a little different. BJJ for instance, is gunna get you your ass kicked. Im not saying its not effective, if there’s one thing I fear its getting into a ground fight with a BJJ practitioner, I am quite simply gunna get my ass broke. On the street however, when there are three of your opponents mates kicking you while you grapple about on the pavement, this isn’t practical. Kali though? Or kickboxing?...that’s a different story, both can be very effective self defense tools (as I have witnessed first hand, knees and elbows hurt heheh)

Someone your size that has done several martial arts (notibly 1 striking art 1 grappling art) is a thing to fear indeed, in the ring/cage or on the street, and the reality is competition wise sparring would be a must, but on the street dude you are gunna fuck someone up regardless of ever having sparred or been punched in the face before because A. your big and B. you trained hard.

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Donor

Taekwondo was big when I was a teen in the 80's, so, that's what I know. I'm also trained in the bo-staff, and with throwing stars.

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Donor
Agreed.

Maybe you don’t intend to shoot them (like In a hostage situation?). Maybe you where surprised? Maybe you just disarmed them and now have their gun etc etc

I agree its unlikely but can happen. I practice gun defense for fun but at the same time if someone stuck one in my face or put one to the back of my head I can take it off them pretty fuckin quickly and un expectantly. Fast reaction and hand skill coupled with psychology could well save me if I was kidnapped or say in a bank robbery etc, so unlikely yes but worth all that training if those few crucial seconds occur in my life? You bet ya.

I am well versed in defense against hand guns, thank you, but the point of my question was not how you got there, but how often you are within 4 to 5 feet from a hostile person when you are wielding an unloaded weapon pointed away from the enemy. I think Cthulhu posted quite an unlikely situation (but still possible) and I think many of you would do well not to underestimate the value of a small sidearm.

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Donor
I am well versed in defense against hand guns, thank you, but the point of my question was not how you got there, but how often you are within 4 to 5 feet from a hostile person when you are wielding an unloaded weapon pointed away from the enemy. I think Cthulhu posted quite an unlikely situation (but still possible) and I think many of you would do well not to underestimate the value of a small sidearm.

I don't underestimate any firearm, but the reality is it is possible to disarm a loaded gun pointed at your face off someone, not easy, but possible. Your question:

If you're carrying a handgun, how often do you get within 4 or 5 feet from someone you intend to shoot?

Well basically, my answer is quite often. If you are in security or law enforcement (as you should be if your carrying round a handgun really) then an analysis of over 1,000 arrests and standoffs in America showed that most officers are in what is deemed "close quarter combat" range when using their firearm, and yes that means loaded and pointed at their target. And sometimes they get disarmed or the gun turned on themselves, and thats from untrained idiots on the side of the road. A staggering number of officer deaths were from their own handgun, the study also showed.

So yeah, I don't carry a handgun, dont intend on getting one pointed at me, but I have trained heavily in gun defense in CQC as an enthusiast, no more. If I got a gun pointed at me I would simply comply, I don't think I would go for a disarm, as it is very easy to pull a trigger but hard to take a gun (safely) off someone. The reality is in an urban or indoor environment, many times will you be in CQC range (1-5ft) with an unarmed opponent who might just be able to take that gun off you.

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Donor

Ah, then it's my bad for not typing out the question to its full extent. Pardon.

It should had been, as directed to Cthulhu:

How often do you get within 4 to 5 feet from a hostile person when you are wielding an unloaded weapon pointed away from him?

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Donor
Ah, then it's my bad for not typing out the question to its full extent. Pardon.

It should had been, as directed to Cthulhu:

How often do you get within 4 to 5 feet from a hostile person when you are wielding an unloaded weapon pointed away from him?

Its all good. I would absolutely agree with that re-worded statement. And if I was in that situation, well then maybe I might go for a disarm :)

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Donor

I'd just throw the gun at the person, then proceed to kick him in the nuts ala Krav Maga x)

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Curator

I can't believe I never responded to this thread...

I've trained in Shotokan Karate, Aikido, niten-ichi ryuu Kenjutsu (as well as a bit of experimentation with nitto ryuu), Italian-school fencing, German-school fencing (German Fechtbücher), Spanish-school fencing, European Broadsword (more German Fechtbücher as well as a few other reconstructionist sources), jojutsu, Aiki-jiujitsu, and Pankration.

I am currently studying Five-Family, Five-Animal Southern Shaolin Kung Fu along with Tai Q'i.

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Used to do some boxing, but not allowed any contact sport these days or I will prob go blind.

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Donor

I've trained in Shotokan Karate, Aikido, niten-ichi ryuu Kenjutsu (as well as a bit of experimentation with nitto ryuu), Italian-school fencing, German-school fencing (German Fechtbücher), Spanish-school fencing, European Broadsword (more German Fechtbücher as well as a few other reconstructionist sources), jojutsu, Aiki-jiujitsu, and Pankration.

I am currently studying Five-Family, Five-Animal Southern Shaolin Kung Fu along with Tai Q'i.

Quite a bit of everything in there! How many years is that in total?

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Curator

Quite a bit of everything in there! How many years is that in total?

I've got maybe 12 years of total study. I've never mastered anything, but I'm fascinated by the martial arts.

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Donor

Kuru, you practiced Jojutsu? Tell me more as I have devoted myself to Jodo which should be similar in many ways.

Oh, since I last posted I have started regularly attending Iaido classes as well as the odd Kendo class here and there.

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Addition to what I chose, I also am an Initiate of Medival german knite style non armed , dagger, spear and 1,5 arm sword techniques ala Arma Aboensis. Did you know you can picklock 1990 toyota with a longsword?

But if theres Kailindo where is Do?

"Do not try,

just Do."

Edited by HollowBarista

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Curator

Kuru, you practiced Jojutsu? Tell me more as I have devoted myself to Jodo which should be similar in many ways.

Oh, since I last posted I have started regularly attending Iaido classes as well as the odd Kendo class here and there.

Briefly; it was a cane art that was described as jojutsu, based on the jo as well as some work with the hanbo.

Really reminded of kenjutsu, was designed originally for a peasant or farmer caste to defend themselves from a samurai without breaking the law.

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Chen-style taijiquan, and that's it. Although I'm still hoping to find a proper wing chun school in my city ^_^

And I should probably point out that I'm not into martial arts for the purpose of booting people in the head :D it never gets to that stage with me, all I have to do is stand up and stop slouching. One of the very few obvious advantages I've ever found in being 6'2" and over 210lbs.

Edited by PhantomStranger

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, all I have to do is stand up and stop slouching. One of the very few obvious advantages I've ever found in being 6'2" and over 210lbs.

I find the same, although I am a little taller and chunkier!

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Donor

Iaido. Seitei if I absolutely have to, Muso Shinden Ryu because that's what I got "stuck" with.

European longsword fencing, German style - aaah, the joys of Ringeck!

Also, various one-handed European versions - sword and shield a la vikng, sword and buckler, and so on.

Tried capoeira but, with iaido four days a week, and a life that looks like mine... :(

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Donor

Elenaria, what Dan? I am currently training under a 6th.

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Curator

Coddling fisticuffs and pampering pugilism.

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I used to do fencing with the foil and sabre, I was going to be trained for the paralympics but ended up in a wheelchair and unable to compete enough to complete training.

I can be a vicious little bugger when cornered as well but that's just learnt from being picked on as a slow target.

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Donor

Jagash: as little as it matters, I have been judged to be skilled to the extent of sandan, third dan. In Japan, the sensei that took me in is nanadan, 7th dan, and refuses to grade higher - what would he then have, to strive to be good enough for?

Here, I practice with Kensei Kensan Kai. It is here lead by a rokudan, 6th dan, the other sensei that are teaching are one godan, 5th dan, and some others. I am very lucky to have found this club; once again, in iaido, I seem to stumble upon the right people wherever I go.

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I checked other, because I find it hard to put Bartitsu under any of the above. Cathegorizing canes and riding crops under "other weapons" just feels strange... =p

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